The Unexpected Gift

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I like the story about Ringo Starr, drummer for the Beatles, that reveals his difficulty singing. He has no range, and so his band mates wrote a song that had about 5 notes in his vocal ability and they recorded it. “I Get By (With A Little Help From My Friends)”. The ultimate expression of how many can come together to create a whole.

When I found myself bereft of spouse, congregation, and friends, I thought I would just have to make myself stronger. More self-sufficient. Get used to the loneliness. But there was a surprise.

The loneliness doesn’t really go away, but it doesn’t have to be all-consuming. Out of nowhere (it seemed) people came in to my orbit that lent me their voices. Widows who had been through death before. Relatives of addicts who didn’t doubt my powerlessness to save another person because they had stood in it also. Wives who had received the knowledge that they would be widows in the near future. And women who simply paid attention, had a heart for empathy, and did not hesitate to reach out.

One dear lady messaged me every morning on my Facebook account, just to check in and say she was thinking of me and wishing me a good day. Every. Single. Morning. This went on for about 2 months, then tapered off to a few times a week, and now once a month or so. It was astonishing. And I was so grateful, because here was someone I barely knew who took a few moments to think of me and let me know I was still in the world, still breathing, and I could carry on a little while longer.

A writer friend sent periodic emails to encourage me, and one sent an actual card and handwritten letter on the Yahrzeit of my husband’s death. Her stories and indomitable sense of humor are still an inspiration to me. Ladies who volunteered to meet me and my kids for an afternoon of not thinking about life. The thoughtful present “just because”. The sister who lets me call her after 11pm for a pep talk.

These unexpected gifts have been scattered through my year like bread crumbs leading me back to a sense of normalcy. I treasure every one. None is forgotten. Where others have disappointed and abandoned me in my time of need, I have been provided with more precious options with a deeper quality.

Some days you barely get by. But Ringo and his friends knew a little something about that. And now, so do I.

Learning With Classroom Pets

All pets bring us closer to the natural world, but specialty pets, such as fish, small pets and reptiles, provide a unique way to inspire kids to learn about the world around them. As teachers and families gear up for the start of a new school year, pets can help teach kids responsibility and how to keep a routine. They can sharpen kids’ math and science skills through activities such as measuring food and water, keeping track of days of the week on a calendar and studying information about their care needs.

Learning in the classroom and beyond
Specialty pets can help make learning fun and help students learn more than just traditional academics. By working with their peers at school (or siblings at home), students learn teamwork and responsibility.

These pets also provide hands-on learning and teach lessons that will serve students their whole lives. According to Joel Sartore, National Geographic photographer and specialty pet owner, specialty pets offer many life skills and learning opportunities, such as:

• Teaching kids responsibility and the importance of routines. Pets need regular food, water and cleaning of their habitats, and these tasks make learning valuable skills fun.
• Helping kids learn to care for something beyond themselves. Kids often see pets as friends and want to protect them. Adults can explain that too much noise scares a pet, and the child will understand the need for good behavior.
• Providing a better understanding of the natural world. Learning about a country or climate becomes more meaningful when a child can interact directly with an animal that has roots there.
• Allowing kids to relate to their peers. Bonding with a pet can give kids common ground with each other and help build friendships.

Create a healthy habitat
If you are considering bringing a specialty pet into your classroom or home, you will need to provide an appropriate habitat. High-quality pet products that mimic animals’ natural environments are the best option to support pet health. Such environments can also spark the curiosity of children into the world of specialty pets with products that represent their habitats in realistic and authentic ways. The pet experts at National Geographic and PetSmart offer the following recommendations to get you started.

For aquatics pets:
The Aqua Oasis Aquarium is a complete starter kit, including an internal power filter with filtration media and a submersible heater. Available in various sizes, it features a curved, seamless bow-front, allowing for uninterrupted views with easy access for feeding. Low-profile hoods and integrated LED lighting add elegance, while the addition of coordinated 3-D backgrounds and decor allow pet parents to create a natural environment.

For reptile pets:
The Reptile Sanctuary ensures your pet will stay securely inside while allowing pet parents to feed, play with and interact through various points around the tank. Depending on the pet’s natural environment, the National Geographic line has tanks designed as desert or tropical climates and coordinated 3-D backgrounds and decor can be added to enhance these natural themes.

For small pets:
The Exploration Loft is available in two sizes and offers a 360-degree view into multi-level play areas and your pets’ daily lives and interesting instinctual behavior. A skylight provides easy access and fresh airflow, plus cleaning is simple with a removable top.

For additional information on the care of specialty pets, including proper habitats, feeding and more, visit http://www.petsmart.com/natgeo. Teachers can apply for a grant to receive a pet in their classroom at http://www.petsmart.com/teachers.

*This content provided from Family Features