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Friday Flash Fiction – “The Assistant”

“Sing a song of sixpence, a pocketful of rye…Four and twenty blackbirds baked in a pie…” The childish notes pierced up to the top of his branches.

Why was the world so violent against his kind?  Or was it his color?  His maligned black brethren were forever croaking “Nevermore”, and to be taunted by this lonely girl was really too much.

The wolf was right.  This was their woods.  They should work together to keep it free from oppression. 

Her red cape was so easy to pick out on the ground.  Even easier once she was stilled.

The Friday Fictioneers is a group of writers who strive each week to tell a story in just 100 words.  Using photo prompts by group founder, Madison Woods, the Fictioneers can be found on FaceBook, Twitter (@FridayFictioneers), or linked throughout the web via their individual blogs.  Read more of today’s Flash here:

Flash fiction is not only fun, it’s become a forcible genre all on its own.  Lee Strickland, writer and lecturer, comments on the ever-pressing need for “sentences that command attention”.  Or, as flash fiction rock star Ravi Mangla puts it, “dynamic sentences that can rise above the noise.”

How did one writer rise above the noise on Twitter?  She dribbled her 8,500 word story “Black Box” out for one hour a night, for ten nights in a row.  Jennifer Egan’s story has now been printed in New Yorker‘s Science Fiction Magazine, complete with the 140-character tweets separated graphically on the page.  And as Strickland says, “You taste the work sentence by sentence.”  That certainly gives writers pause to assess the worth, weight, and value of each sentence in a piece, and cut accordingly!

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34 thoughts on “Friday Flash Fiction – “The Assistant”

    • Buzzards definitely get a bad rap – I have a neighbor that actually feeds them in her yard because, “there isn’t something dead to eat ALL the time”! That’s a bit far for me, but I’ll defend them on paper!

      • From what I read, they actually hunt and even eat things like earthworms, not just carrion. And even more interesting to me was that many of them look like hawks. They’re beautiful!

  1. Dear Karen,

    Strange to hear the language of the ‘oppressed’ from that poor, put upon blackbird and then to see violent the end result. I enjoyed the parallels to our long now and the rants and reactions of various ‘groups’ that inhabit the ‘forests’. A nice piece of writing and warning not to wear red hoodies.

    Aloha,

    Doug

  2. poor misunderstood blackbird (and his dark feathered relatives!) I hope Red keeps her hood down. She might catch a glimpse as he dive bombs her 😉

  3. I enjoyed it. Was this a political riff? Was the Hood eating skittles on her way from 7-11? and how many people had their fingers in the pie? A lot of unanswered questions and imagery here. (smile) Randy

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